SePRO
About SePRO Career Opportunity News Contact Us Labels & Safety Data Sheet
Home
Aquatic Products
Ornamental Products
Turf Products
Consumer Pond Products
SePRO
Greenhouse & Nursery Products
Pipron® Back

Powdery Mildew:
The fungus that eats at everything green, including your profits.


It's as common on your plants as the soil around them. Powdery mildew. If conditions are right, it can go from one leaf to an epidemic in three or four days. It's always there, waiting for you to ignore it. Waiting to eat into your plants and profits. To keep that from happening, you must continually employ integrated disease control procedures against the spread and development of powdery mildew.

We hope to give you all the information you need to do just that.

Watching for conditions and telltale signs.
The first sign of powdery mildew is very hard to detect: Yellow spotting on leaves or tiny blistering on the leaves or flowers, caused by yet unseen lesions forming rapidly. Left unchecked, white lesions start appearing all over the leaves, stems or flowers. Spores by the hundreds are produced on the white mycelium (the thread-like body of the fungus) growing over the tissue, giving the disease the look of white powder.

Ideal conditions for infection:

When greenhouse temperatures range from 65 to 75F, and leaves become dampened by
condensation (dew) at the end of the day.
In damp, shady outdoor locations when the days are warm and dry and the nights are cool
and damp.
High relative humidity, crowded conditions and poor air circulation also help speed the
development of this disease.

Taking control of the greenhouse environment.
Any control measures you take should be aimed directly at the prevention of powdery mildew development. For starters, you have to control what foes on in yours plants' environment, especially the greenhouse. First and foremost, you must stop condensation from forming on plant leaves at the end of the day.

Here's how.
Cultural practices to help prevent powdery mildew in the greenhouse:

1. Keep low velocity air moving over and through the foliage, especially at then end of the day.
2. If the relative humidity exceeds 90 percent, add some heat to the greenhouse as soon as
possible, regardless of the outside temperature.
3. After the temperature inside the greenhouse begins to rise, ventilate for a few minutes to
exhaust this warm, moisture-laden air and stop heating as you continue to cool the
greenhouse for the night.
4. Repeating this dehumidification cycle two or three times at nightfall will go a long way toward
preventing condensation-and the start of powdery mildew.

The use of fungicides in the greenhouse.
While cultural practices are extremely important in keeping powdery mildew under control in the greenhouse, you know they (more than likely) won't be enough. For best control, you also need to add a comprehensive fungicide program-one that not only eradicates, but prevents as well.

OUR RECOMMENDATION?
Use Pipron* and Rubigan® E.C. in rotation.

Pipron has been proven for more than 20 years to be an excellent eradicant, especially for greenhouse roses. And because Rubigan E.C. is a strong powdery mildew preventative, the two working in rotation offer extremely strong cost-effective control.

The Benefits of Pipron:
It is the industry standard for fast, reliable eradication of powdery mildew in the greenhouse.
It is gentle on foliage and floral tissue.
It helps restore luster on most varieties of greenhouse roses.
It leaves no visible residue that would detract from the beauty of the plant.
It has shown no evidence of fungus resistance.
It is compatible with many other pesticides.


The Benefits of Rubigan E.C.
It is quickly absorbed into the plant foliage and is not easily washed off by irrigation once it
has dried.
It leaves no visible residue that would detract from the beauty of the plant.
It is less prone to develop resistance problems than some fungicides.
It's locally systemic action spreads throughout the leaf and provides long residual protection.
It is an extremely effective and economical fungicide for the prevention and control of
powdery mildew.

Application procedures for achieving maximum results

With Pipron
Because Pipron is a contact fungicide, it must actually come "in contact" with the disease lesions to be effective. So, for best results, follow these procedures:

1. Mix 8 ounces of Pipron in 100 gallons of water for maximum eradication action.
2. Spray high volumes of water at high pressure, being sure to thoroughly wet all foliage,
including the underside of the leaves.
3. Use a reliable, non-phytotoxic spreader/sticker to retain the spray on the foliage.
4. Spray at the earliest signs of mildew infestation, preferably early in the morning or evening so
the foliage will remain moist longer.

Pipron has been used on many varieties of roses and other labeled plant material, however environmental conditions, plant vigor and the use of other pesticides can affect plant sensitivity. Before treating a new variety, test for sensitivity before applying on a large scale.

Pipron has been shown to be compatible with many other insecticides and fungicides. Before tank mixing Pipron with another pesticide, test for compatibility and plant sensitivity before applying on a large scale. Do not mix Pipron with Pentac® WP or Aquaflo® formulations.

(Please note! Pipron is for greenhouse use only)

With Rubigan E.C.
Rubigan is a locally systemic preventative fungicide, with moderate contact activity. In the greenhouse, it works best in rotation with Pipron by following these procedures:

1. Mix 3 - 4 ounces per 100 gallons of water for spraying.
2. Use a fine mist spray technique to avoid droplet accumulation at the leaf margins. Be sure to
cover leaf surfaces, especially the top parts of the plant, but avoid runoff. Too much spray
could have an adverse effect, acting like a growth regulator on the leaf edges.
3. For preventative control, continue treatment at 14 to 21 day intervals depending on disease
pressure.

Controlling powdery mildew in the field.
If your business is container or field-grown ornamentals, controlling the growing environment outdoors will obviously be much tougher than controlling it in the greenhouse. Although Mother Nature is unpredictable and you can't do much about temperature and precipitation, there are certain things you can do to help reduce the growing conditions for the development of powdery mildew.

Cultural practices to help prevent powdery mildew in container and field-grown ornamentals:

1. Avoid over-fertilizing your plants with nitrogen.
2. When you plant, avoid areas with excess shade and do not overcrowd.
3. Prune away all vegetation that tends to produce shade.
4. Late in the day, do not use overhead irrigation.

The use of fungicides in the great outdoors.
The better your cultural practices, the better off your plants are going to be. But frankly, following the best cultural practices alone will not control powdery mildew. You need to enlist the help of a good fungicide. One that, like cultural practices, can help prevent the disease from getting a foothold on your plants.

OUR RECOMMENDATION?
Rubigan E.C.


Rubigan E.C. offers long-lasting protection against powdery mildew-14 days more-and goes to work immediately to protect your plants from infection.

The Benefits of Rubigan E.C.

In the Field
It is quickly absorbed into the plant foliage and is not easily washed off by rain once it is dried.
It leaves no visible residue that would detract from the beauty of the plant.
It is less prone to develop resistance problems than some fungicides.
It's locally systemic action spreads throughout the leaf and stops fungal growth by interfering
with ergo sterol formation.
It is an extremely effective and economical fungicide for the prevention and control of
powdery mildew.

Application procedures for achieving maximum results.

With Rubigan E.C.
Rubigan is a locally systemic preventative fungicide, with moderate contact activity. In the field, follow these procedures for best results:


1. Mix the appropriate amount of Rubigan E.C. depending upon the disease severity
(see charts).
2. Apply Rubigan E.C. with sufficient pressure and spray volume to ensure thorough wetting of
all plant surfaces. Special care should be taken to thoroughly wet new terminal growth and
plant areas already diseased with powdery mildew. For preventative control, continue
treatment at 14-day intervals.
3. When leaf infection is greater than 10% and environmental conditions encourage disease
development, use the higher rates and shorter spray intervals indicated in the chart below.

Chart


Comparing costs of spray programs
Obviously a good fungicide spray program has to be cost-effective as it is disease-effective. And attempting to find those costs is complicated because of a number of factors:

Safety precautions.
Wear of the application equipment.
Labor costs.
The cost of materials.
Speed of application.
Spray intervals.

The savings you can realize using one particular program over another can be hidden-unless you analyze each factor carefully.

One good example is the use of Rubigan E.C. as a protectant. Not only will you save on material used per acre of plants, but on labor as well because applications are faster and spray intervals are longer. In addition, Rubigan us quickly absorbed into your plants, dries in minutes, and wont wash off once it's dried-even in heavy rainfall.

Another good example for saving money is using Pipron as a fast and effective eradicant on greenhouse plants just about ready for market. Within 24 hours, Pipron begins working to kill powdery mildew in the greenhouse without leaving any unsightly residue to take away from the beauty of the plant.

Yes, beating powdery mildew is a tough, constant job. But, by controlling your plants' environment and using proven disease and cost-effective fungicides like Pipron and Rubigan E.C., you and your bottom line can definitely come out winners!

Home | About SePRO | Our Pledge | News | Contact Us | Links | Labels & Safety Data Sheets
 
© Copyright 1998-2017 SePRO Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
* Trademarks of SePRO Corporation.
Career Opportunities | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer